Book Review · Contemporary · YA Fiction

The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sedoti: Book Review

25546710A teenage misfit named Hawthorn Creely inserts herself in the investigation of missing person Lizzie Lovett, who disappeared mysteriously while camping with her boyfriend. Hawthorn doesn’t mean to interfere, but she has a pretty crazy theory about what happened to Lizzie. In order to prove it, she decides to immerse herself in Lizzie’s life. That includes taking her job… and her boyfriend. It’s a huge risk — but it’s just what Hawthorn needs to find her own place in the world.


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Book Review · Contemporary · YA Fiction

The Way I Used To Be by Amber Smith: Book Review

23546634 (1)In the tradition of Speak, this extraordinary debut novel shares the unforgettable story of a young woman as she struggles to find strength in the aftermath of an assault.

Eden was always good at being good. Starting high school didn’t change who she was. But the night her brother’s best friend rapes her, Eden’s world capsizes.

What was once simple, is now complex. What Eden once loved—who she once loved—she now hates. What she thought she knew to be true, is now lies. Nothing makes sense anymore, and she knows she’s supposed to tell someone what happened but she can’t. So she buries it instead. And she buries the way she used to be.

Told in four parts—freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior year—this provocative debut reveals the deep cuts of trauma. But it also demonstrates one young woman’s strength as she navigates the disappointment and unbearable pains of adolescence, of first love and first heartbreak, of friendships broken and rebuilt, and while learning to embrace a power of survival she never knew she had hidden within her heart.


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Book Review · Contemporary · YA Fiction

Identical by Ellen Hopkins: Book Review

2241059Do twins begin in the womb?
Or in a better place?

Kaeleigh and Raeanne are identical down to the dimple. As daughters of a district-court judge father and a politician mother, they are an all-American family — on the surface. Behind the facade each sister has her own dark secret, and that’s where their differences begin.

For Kaeleigh, she’s the misplaced focus of Daddy’s love, intended for a mother whose presence on the campaign trail means absence at home. All that Raeanne sees is Daddy playing a game of favorites — and she is losing. If she has to lose, she will do it on her own terms, so she chooses drugs, alcohol, and sex.

Secrets like the ones the twins are harboring are not meant to be kept — from each other or anyone else. Pretty soon it’s obvious that neither sister can handle it alone, and one sister must step up to save the other, but the question is — who?

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Book Review · Contemporary · YA Fiction

The Infinite Moment of Us by Lauren Myracle: Mini Review

17290266*I’m going to be starting a new segment on Book Savant: Mini Reviews! In these short bursts, I’ll be summarizing the book, commenting on what I liked and disliked about it, and if I would recommend it to a friend. Short, sweet, and perfect if a fellow reader wants to know whether to pick up a certain book or not. And we’ll be starting Mini Reviews with The Infinite Moment of us by Lauren Myracle!*

Summary: Wren Gray graduates high school, ready for whatever life has next for her. She deferred university for a year in favor for travelling to Guatemala for a volunteer project. Enter Charlie Parker: a poor and underprivileged kid who falls for Wren over the summer. The Infinite Moment of Us is a young adult contemporary between a girl and a boy who couldn’t be any more different. Continue reading “The Infinite Moment of Us by Lauren Myracle: Mini Review”

Book Review · Contemporary · YA Fiction

He Said, She Said by Kwame Alexander: Review

17296690He says: Omar “T-Diddy” Smalls has got it made—a full football ride to UMiami, hero-worship status at school, and pick of any girl at West Charleston High. She says: Football, shmootball. Here’s what Claudia Clarke cares about: Harvard, the poor, the disenfranchised, the hungry, the staggering teen pregnancy rate, investigative journalism . . . the list goes on. She does not have a minute to waste on Mr. T-Diddy Smalls and his harem of bimbos.

He Said, She Said is a fun and fresh novel from Kwame Alexander that throws these two high school seniors together when they unexpectedly end up leading the biggest social protest this side of the Mississippi—with a lot of help from Facebook and Twitter. The stakes are high, the romance is hot, and when these worlds collide, watch out! Continue reading “He Said, She Said by Kwame Alexander: Review”